Solutions

A Healthy You – Start with the Basics:

Before self-diagnosing or pursuing a treatment plan, please see your health care practitioner to eliminate any health condition or infection that may mimic ADHD.

Even if symptoms change over time, ADHD starts in childhood. People don’t just “get adult ADHD” so make sure to talk with your doctor and/or mental health practitioner about your symptoms.

A thorough diagnosis should include your mental health history, including childhood. To ensure a proper diagnosis, find a licensed psychotherapist or neurologist who specializes in diagnosing ADHD in adults.

To start off, you will want to make sure your body is functioning properly.

Be sure to have your thyroid tested. A hyper-thyroid may create an agitated state of mind and body, causing panic attacks, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. Symptoms of hypo-thyroid may mimic lethargic, inattentive ADHD-like traits, such as brain fog and slow cognitive processing issues.

I also suggest having a blood panel and/or urine analysis completed, if you suspect any of the following deficiencies or abnormalities: Vitamin B and D, hormones, anemia or low-iron (especially in premenopausal women), liver function, kidney function, bladder, candida/yeasts, or other type of infection.

Leaky gut and food sensitivities are also suspect, as they can cause emotional issues and often mimic depression. Chronic pain and inflammation are red flags of underlying health conditions, like adrenal fatigue or autoimmune disease, and often result from a stressful lifestyle and a poor diet.

I encourage you to start with the basics and visit your doctor. If you are diagnosed with ADHD, try some of the tips, tools and techniques I suggest in this blog.

Even if you don’t have ADHD, the tools can still work for you! You are not alone and I’m happy you’re here.

The solutions shared at Daydream Health are not meant to treat or cure any disease or existing condition. Please see your doctor regarding any serious medical or mental health issue as needed. I am not a doctor or health care practitioner.